And the photos to go with the last post

Some photos. 🙂

A cleaned out and freshly strawed goat shed. We're keeping it as clean as can be in readiness in case Miss Anna decides to grace us with kids.

A cleaned out and freshly strawed goat shed. We’re keeping it as clean as can be in readiness in case Miss Anna decides to grace us with kids.

Elevated feed bowl, fresh water.

Elevated feed bowl, fresh water and my bulgy lady with her udder (she has milk too! :D)

Segregated chook pen

Segregated chook pen

Our nesting boxes with the little gated one for Mr Rooster in the evenings.

Our nesting boxes with the little gated one for Mr Rooster in the evenings.

The sectioned off run with the screen door allowing access

The sectioned off run with the screen door allowing access

The new entry and exit for our birds into their shed. The hole in which Miss Anna decided to try and enter. And yes, the silly duffer actually got in there.

The new entry and exit for our birds into their shed. The hole in which Miss Anna decided to try and enter. And yes, the silly duffer actually got in there.

The old shed straw mucked out ans spread around to try and absorb some of the swamp.

The old shed straw mucked out ans spread around to try and absorb some of the swamp.

My Anatidae family

My Anatidae family, Mandy on the left, Milly the grey and white drake, Molly the white drake with Yin hiding behind him and Yang down the front of the tyre with water in it. And then there’s a Henny Penny on the right.

The 'shrooms I found growing in my greenhouse. I only wish I knew 100% if they were edible or not. Not an area one wants to experiment in.

The ‘shrooms I found growing in my greenhouse. I only wish I knew 100% if they were edible or not. Not an area one wants to experiment in.

My makeshift spud garden. 1 cardboard box, some bird wire and some of last years spuds saved for 'seed' planted in spent chicken straw. I buried them in some compost soil today.

My makeshift spud garden. 1 cardboard box, some bird wire and some of last years spuds saved for ‘seed’ planted in spent chicken straw. I buried them in some compost soil today.

An itty bitty cauliflower head forming.

An itty bitty cauliflower head forming.

Next area on which t address our attentions is the pond and food forest garden.

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12 thoughts on “And the photos to go with the last post

  1. Lynda says:

    Looking very clean and tidy. Goodness, Anna certainly has filled out. I think you are right. Expect to be a midwife any day – probably in the middle of the night – so be ready with torch and knitted pants. I cant give any advice at all. No goat experience here. Look Elsewhere.

  2. The Life of Clare says:

    It all looks fabulous. I love the spud garden! You’re right about the mushrooms, not something one wants to experiment in.

    • It’s still very frustrating, looking at what could potentially be a wonderful, natural and easy food source.
      The idea for the spud garden came from Craig Castree from Edible Gardens (http://ediblegarden.webs.com/) whom I was lucky enough to meet at a fruit management workshop. We discussed managing citrus trees and Craig mentioned that he grows his under his citrus trees but on top of the soil to protect the citrus roots. He makes a cage lined with straw or cardboard (I don’t remember which) and piles it up to grow the spuds. When he harvests them it’s just a case of lift the cage and grab the spuds. The soil can be spread around as mulch/compost or moved elsewhere and the extra nutrients and water discarded by the spuds aids the citrus. I figured it was worth a try and being inside the greenhouse means I won’t toast them with our frosts either. 🙂

  3. Jo says:

    Love the photos of your chicken and goat house. Still working up to being brave about chickens – but you are full on farmers. So brave and resourceful!

    • Not exactly full on farmers. Maybe farmy kind of dabblers. 🙂 Keeping chickens for eggs is easy peasy and awesome fun. Just make sure you read up on yur breeds so you know what you’re getting. Isa browns are great for egg production but not so kind if you want them to free range and expect a neat and tidy garden. Pekin bantams however are much kinder on the garden but not such wonderful egg layers and their eggs are pretty small. Pickin’ Chicken app for iPhone is a great tool. And start with 3 girls too as they like to be in a flock. 🙂

  4. narf77 says:

    Whatsay you change the name of this blog to “A” rabidlittlehippy and then I won’t ever have to wait ages to hit “R” in my overstuffed RSS Feed reader after being chained to the media studies wheel for a week! Nope? It was worth a try 😉

  5. Robbie says:

    You have a great space to work with, and I really like your raised beds. What great ideas for raised beds! 🙂

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